So tell me…?

Something that I’ve found out along this journey with me, my head and I is that questions are really important.

It was that question that has become an advocate for helping others with mental health concerns that first triggered my understanding of the need for questions; R U OK?

I’ve always been interested in mental health and I saw this group pushing people to understand and use the question R U Ok? to start talking to others about what’s going on, what’s wrong, what’s troubling you, what’re your concerns? I thought it was a great idea and I bookmarked it in my head to use someday if I saw someone having a hard time.

I wasn’t sure that it would be effective but I planned to give it a go anyway; nothing ventured, nothing gained, right?

But then, before I had a chance to use it to help another person, someone asked me, and I burst into tears!! Just like that! That is how powerful the question is and how right on target it is to really hit the spot when someone is down, anxious, fearful, despairing etc.

I didn’t think it would work. But I walked into a doctor’s room to get some routine results, she asked ‘are you okay?’ and it turns out I wasn’t, to a severe degree which I had not even realised up until that moment.

When she said, ‘how are you?’, as I walked in the door I said fine. That question is just too automatic and we are too programmed into a standard response that doesn’t really give an answer. We know when we ask it that it’s more for form than for really enquiring into someone’s health. It has become a greeting more than a query. Not to say that it can’t be used as a question; some people can inject that something extra that shows that they genuinely are enquiring about your health, but usually that’s not the case.

But there is something unique, direct and unusual about the question ‘are you okay?’ that hits a nerve, that registers with a person as an actual question and that demonstrates some extra kind of care and interest on behalf of the asker.

Questions are so important in mental health.

We can’t lay open a wound, or show an obvious dislocation, or contusion, or register a positive blood culture, or low blood level as evidence of our condition.

We may not look ill, or sick, or injured to other people.

All the evidence of our ailment is locked inside our heads.

It is literally all in our minds, but not in the way that that saying is usually used, to suggest that it’s a figment of our imagination!

There is nothing imagined or exaggerated or fictitious about any mental illness.

However there is a level of difficulty for anyone treating a mental illness, be it doctors, nurses, psychiatrists, psycholgists, counsellors or any other health professionals.

To diagnose a mental illness, as with any other condition, a set of diagnostic criteria must be met. But none of those criteria are obvious when a patient walks in the door.

The diagnoser (doctor or psychiatrist) must be able to draw out the information that they need to make a diagnosis by asking questions. They need to ask a lot of questions. Questions designed to gather information, to confirm suspicions, to determine signs and symptoms of the condition.

They have to be very skilled in asking questions AND in listening to the answers for clues about what is going on with the patient.

It takes time! Sometimes a lot of time. Sometimes questions are asked over and over. There is a purpose to that; it is to gather the right information so that the right diagnosis is made and the right treatment given. It might seem repetitive but every question fills a useful part of the overall picture. It’s not a sign of incompetence on the part of the person asking the questions; its a part of their professional skill.

Patients most often don’t know what is going on with them. I’m a health professional with a clinical understanding of mental illness but I still didn’t recognise mental illness in myself. I just thought I was stressed at work. The fact that I was constantly obsessing over work all day and night, that I couldn’t sleep, that I was being clingy and petty and being a huge strain on my husband with my concerns and fears and anxiety didn’t occur to me to be an excessive reaction. So I can’t even imagine how patients with no prior knowledge of mental illness feel when they start to suffer from symptoms.

They might be scared, afraid, stressed, anxious, overwhelmed, confused, in denial or fearful of what the diagnosis will mean and what treatment will be prescribed. So the doctor also has to tread carefully around the person’s soft or sore spots but still trod and poke enough to get what they need to do their job.

In any emotional state a person has more difficulty remembering and recalling, trouble giving an accurate history, limited ability in listening and responding, and struggles with taking in information. This is one of the reasons why questions need to be repeated; to be sure that the right answer has been given. It’s also why seeing multiple doctors on different occasions can be useful in building a clearer picture of what is going on.

Often a patient may not be diagnosed immediately, because of these factors. It may be considered in the patient’s best interests to allow them time to go away and calm down, to give more thought to the history of symptoms that they have experienced, and then to bring them back and ask further questions. Of course it isn’t safe for all patients to be sent away; some need to be kept for their own safety, some need to have treatment started immediately. For those who are sent home to return late, maybe the same questions will be asked all over again, and although it seems tedious to the patient, it is all for the purpose of gathering as much information as possible so that the best outcome can be achieved for every patient.

So, questions.

Tell me what’s been going on?

How have you been feeling?

When did this start?

Who have you already seen about this?

What treatments have you tried?

Has anyone in your family experienced any mental illness?

How long have these symptoms been going on for?

How severe are your symptoms?

What symptom is the most difficult for you?

What has brought you here today?

How are you today?

Compared to then, how are you now?

What do you think has triggered these symptoms?

What has happened that might have caused this?

What do you know about your condition?

What do you know about the treatment for this condition?

What’s the worst symptom that you are experiencing?

How are you coping?

Are you experiencing any side effects?

Give me a run down on how the last week has been for you?

How often do you shower?

How often have you been getting out of the house?

Are you finding enjoyment in life?

How has your motivation been?

What have you been getting up to?

Have you been hearing or seeing things that don’t exist?

Has anyone been speaking to you through other objects?

Are you suicidal?

Have you had thoughts of harming yourself or others?

Do you have a plan to harm yourself?

Have you had suicidal thoughts?

Have you had thoughts that are frightening to you?

How has your sleep been?

Tell me what you are afraid of?

Do you ever have periods of great energy when you can achieve a lot? Or when you don’t need sleep?

When are you not anxious? Are there any places where you feel comfortable?

What things make you anxious? What things trigger a panic attack?

There sure are a lot of questions that can be asked!! And this is probably the tip of the iceberg really, these are just the questions that I can remember from the health professionals that I saw. I’m sure there are many others for other mental health disorders.

And yet, the most important question is whichever one you ask to the person that you see struggling. It really doesn’t matter what it is. It can be r u ok?, how ya doing?, what’s up with you?, how are things?, how have you been going lately?.

As long as you take the courageous step of asking and listening, you will be doing the right thing. Go you!!

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How to bird watch

Okay, for starters that is a pretty big statement!

I am an amateur at bird watching, having only started last year. I am no expert at it that’s for sure!

But I am passionate about it and enjoy it and want everyone else to have fun with it too.

I didn’t take any classes or get any instruction in bird watching so all that I can share is my personal journey with bird watching.

My approach is:

1) Listen for bird calls. A lot of birds sing constantly or use calls to check in with each other. If you can hear the song you can follow it to find the bird.

2) Walk around with your eyes open wherever you are. Look in the tops of trees especially dead trees for odd shapes that may be birds. Look for flying birds. Look into shrubs and bushes for movement. Look into trees as you pass by. Continuously scan your environment. Look into reeds and grasses on the edge of waterways. Watch the path in front of you. My best discoveries have been at random moments when I least expected them!

3) Go to a likely location. Choose parks and gardens and reserves. Go to wetlands, swamps, rivers, lakes, the beach. Find out where other bird watchers go and follow them.

4) Walk around slowly and steadily. Movements frighten birds away, even small movements if they are sudden. Walking slowly and making movements carefully gives you the best chance of seeing birds.

5) Be quiet. Noises scare birds away so treading quietly and making as little noise as possible gives you an advantage.

Well these are just my ideas.

I’m not an expert just an enthusiast. I’d love to see you out bird watching and finding the excitement and enjoyment in it that I do.

Have fun!

Birds birds birds birds birds

Are you surprised? More birds. What a shock!

This holiday has been one of the best I’ve ever had for bird watching. Considering that I only took up bird watching late last year this isn’t a massive statement.

But I’ve found so many great birds here, those that you come across every day, those that are specific to the area and some I’ve ever seen before.

On Friday 4th July I had a slow morning in bed and didn’t get outside til lunch time. It was super windy so I didn’t really want to go out, but turns out once I got out there it was beautifully sunny and quite a nice day, if you could avoid the wind.

All I did once I got out of the house was take a slow stroll around town but there were still some beautiful parrots around that I had the chance to stop, sit down and watch while taking photos. As always, just being able to find the birds by recognising their song or glimpsing their colours is exhilarating. Getting the chance to get up close and take pictures without them flying away is super exciting. Having some oblivious people or an aggressive Magpie chase my birds away is annoying!! But I still got some great pics!

I love this shot of the four Galahs making a perfect square!!

I love this shot of the four Galahs making a perfect square!!

Pretty Galah ruffled by the wind

Pretty Galah ruffled by the wind

Stunning pair of Eastern Rosellas, looks like an adult and baby

Stunning pair of Eastern Rosellas, looks like an adult and baby

Adult Eastern Rosella feeding in the grass

Adult Eastern Rosella feeding in the grass

Cute juvenile Eastern Rosella feeding with its parent in the grass

Cute juvenile Eastern Rosella feeding with its parent in the grass

Queenscliff pier - beautiful in the sun but the wind is brisk!

Queenscliff pier – beautiful in the sun but the wind is brisk!

Silver gull in the sun

Silver gull in the sun

Juvenile Crimson Rosella blending into an olive tree

Juvenile Crimson Rosella blending into an olive tree

Juvenile Crimson Rosella blending into an olive tree

Juvenile Crimson Rosella blending into an olive tree

Juvenile Crimson Rosella eating berries with its claws

Juvenile Crimson Rosella eating berries with its claws

On Saturday I went to visit a friend and found a beautiful parkland near her house. As luck would have it, as I parked and got out of the car I heard the screech of a cockatoo and as I looked up there were a flock of Yellow-tailed Black-Cockatoos!! I have never seen these before in my life and had the best time watching them break open and eat pine cones high up in the trees as the wind almost blew them off! As I got out of the car it started raining! Taking photos while holding an umbrella under my arm and scrambling up a very soft incline was not easy! My umbrella got blown away and I got wet! My photos were a bit blurry as well. So once the shower passed I crossed the road to get a better shot, and would you believe there was a set of stairs that took me all the way up to within a couple of metres of the tree?! Bad luck and good luck so close together; interesting!

Flock of Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos eating pine cones on top of a tree

Flock of Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos eating pine cones on top of a tree. You can see how strong the wind is!

Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo perched precariously at the top of a tree

Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo perched precariously at the top of a tree

Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo crunching on pine cones

Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo crunching on pine cones

The fortuitous staircase to nowhere that let me get up close and personal with Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos!

The fortuitous staircase to nowhere that let me get up close and personal with Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos!

After spending half an hour with the black cockatoos, I finally made it to where I was headed in the first place: Fyansford Common. Such a beautiful park alongside the river and teeming with birds!!

Here’s another first for me, I’ve never seen this bird before. I think it’s a Grey Strike-thrush, as far as I can tell from my bird guide, but I’d love an expert opinion 🙂

Grey Strike-thrush singing its beautiful song on the rails

Grey Strike-thrush singing its beautiful song on the rails

Another Grey Strike-Thrush? Probably too far to tell, tree

Another Grey Strike-Thrush? Probably too far to tell

Cute fluffy little pair of New Holland Honeyeaters, sadly out of focus, dead bushes

Cute fluffy little pair of New Holland Honeyeaters, sadly out of focus but still awesome! I’ve never seen so many of these!

A Willy Wagtail mid-dance with its tail feathers fanned out and side wings pointing down about to flit away

A Willy Wagtail mid-dance with its tail feathers fanned out and side wings pointing down about to flit away

I thought I was catching a snap of a swallow resting, but on reflection it looks more like a Willy Wagtail

I thought I was catching a snap of a swallow resting, but on reflection it looks more like a Willy Wagtail from the front

I finally got a face-on photo of the Red-Browed Finch!! Earlier in the year I got a snap of the back of this pretty little bird in the Yea Wetlands, and by chance I stumbled upon this little firetail while looking at wrens and other birds in Fyanford Common. Score!!

Red-browed Finch flitting around with the many wrens and other tiny birds

Red-browed Finch flitting around with the many wrens and other tiny birds

Female Superb Fairy-Wren with vivid blue tail, gum tree

Female Superb Fairy-Wren with vivid blue tail

Baby Australasian Grebes ducking and diving under water when they notice me looking at them!, river, reeds

Baby Australasian Grebes ducking and diving under water when they notice me looking at them!

Then in the early evening we went for a delightful walk along part of the Bellarine Rail Trail near Swan Bay and saw some lovely birds.

Male and female Chestnut Teal on a pond

Male Chestnut Teal duck on a windy pond

A beautiful time of night and a beautiful White-faced Heron on the railway signal

A beautiful time of night and a beautiful White-faced Heron on the railway signal

A bonus sighting of a heritage diesel engine and train carriages near Lakers Siding, sunset

A bonus sighting of a heritage diesel engine and train carriages near Lakers Siding

And for the grand finale, an amazing Eastern Great Egret! I saw one from the train on Thursday and wished that I could get a shot. So I was very excited to see this Egret fly over as we were walking back to the car. They are really shy so we took shots from far away and then tried to creep up. Unfortunately we were losing the light by the time we saw the Egret so most of the shots come to nothing but I like this shot anyway. Then the train blew its whistle and it took off, ever so gracefully!

I’m so excited about these holidays. I’ve seen Egrets, Herons, Spoonbills and Ibis that I haven’t seen in years since I left our small farm out of town to live in the city and study. Seeing them all again gets me reminiscing and remembering the good parts of my childhood when we would watch the birds in the channel or out in the wet paddocks

Beautiful and graceful Eastern Great Egret stalking fish in the backwater, reeds, lake

Beautiful and graceful Eastern Great Egret stalking fish in the backwater

And so we come to the last day of our holiday! It really has been perfect and I’ve enjoyed myself so much! And the weather has behaved beautifully; on our last day it rained and rained! So we were happy to leave and head for home. Isn’t that the dream?

We had plans for walks but it was a bit wet early on so we drove on and ate breakfast out. Luckily the rain cleared out over breakfast so we headed out to the Edwards Point State Faunal Reserve on the point just out of St Leonards. It really was beautiful, if chilly, and the rain held off for a couple of hours while we wondered around.

I love herons for their grace and elegance. I love shots of birds flying and I accidentally got them both together! Not well focused but okay.

Focusing on the standing White-faced Heron and another flew right into my photo!, lake, reeds

Focusing on the standing White-faced Heron and another flew right into my photo!

This one I am proud of, not well focused but I got the heron landing!, lake, reeds

This one I am proud of, not well focused but I got the heron landing!

Black Swans in the water, lake reeds

Black Swans in the water

Edwards Point State Faunal Reserve on an overcast July day

Edwards Point State Faunal Reserve on an overcast July day

Edwards Point State Faunal Reserve on an overcast July day

Edwards Point State Faunal Reserve on an overcast July day

Another Eastern Great Heron - two in two days!

Another Eastern Great Heron – two in two days!

Edwards Point State Faunal Reserve boardwalk across the water

Edwards Point State Faunal Reserve boardwalk across the water

And the lovely beach, stunning as always! sand, clouds, waves

And the lovely beach, stunning as always!

Majestic Australian Pelican swimming on the calm seas

Majestic Australian Pelican swimming on the calm seas with Mornington Peninsula in the background

And here we are, down to the last bird for the holiday! The freeways from Geelong to Melbourne and Ballarat to Melbourne are hotspots for birds of prey and we stopped to take a picture of this one. It was interesting to see chickens in the yard of the house over which the bird was hovering, running for cover; smart!

Not sure what bird of prey but looks impressive soaring overhead

Not sure what bird of prey but looks impressive soaring overhead

Some kind of bird of prey threatening the local chickens! blue sky

Some kind of bird of prey threatening the local chickens!

Thank you holiday! You have energised and refreshed me and I’ll always remember the wonderful bird finding, watching and photographing that I have so enjoyed!

I highly recommend Swan Bay, Lake Lorne and Queenscliff in general for bird watchers. There are so many different types and such an abundance of birds! A fabulous area and one I’ll be happy to return to in the return. But for now, onward and upward 🙂

Today’s birds

[Written yesterday, Thursday 3rd July]

This one is just for me.

I love bird watching. Anyone who has read anything on my blog or who knows me in person is familiar with this.

So these are my day’s birds!

I’m on holiday right now and it couldn’t be more perfect, more and more birds every day; the perfect recipe for happy days.

First up was my walk down to the Queenscliff Railway Station

Help needed - I am yet to get a good enough shot to identify this fast little flitter

Help needed – I am yet to get a good enough shot to identify this fast little flitter

A parting shot of this tiny fast birdie

A parting shot of this tiny fast birdie

Loud and beautiful Red Wattlebird

Loud and beautiful Red Wattlebird

Another shot of the gorgeous Red Wattlebird

Another shot of the gorgeous Red Wattlebird

Then Lake Lorne in Drysdale for an afternoon lap

How perfect is this? A beautiful Black Swan swimming along with its reflection

This is so perfect! A beautiful Black Swan swimming along with its reflection

Pure luck - a flitting Welcome Swallow with the early crescent moon!

Pure luck – a flitting Welcome Swallow with the early crescent moon!

Straw-necked Ibis flying in formation to their roost

Straw-necked Ibis flying in formation to their roost

Australian White Ibis at roost in the top of a tree in the middle of Lake Lorne

Australian White Ibis at roost in the top of a tree in the middle of Lake Lorne

Stunning pair of Eastern Rosellas at Lake Lorne

Stunning pair of Eastern Rosellas at Lake Lorne – one of the day’s highlights

Magpie-lark usually called a mudlark dancing in a tree

Magpie-lark usually called a mudlark dancing in a tree

Little Black or Great Cormorants at roost in an old dead tree

Little Black or Great Cormorants at roost in an old dead tree

Great day all in all 🙂

Heritage steam

Today I went on an exciting adventure. Me and a whole bunch of kids with mum, dad, grandma, uncle etc. I felt just like a kid setting off on an exciting day trip, and as I was surrounded by exactly that, it really helped set the mood!

I arrived at the heritage Queenscliff station at twenty to eleven in the morning to find the train I was about to catch steaming and puffing away with doors wide open ready to receive travelers. What an adorable cutesie sight!! A glorious sunny day, the chill of the morning worn off to a nice comfortable day and a trip in this old steam train to boot!!

Ticket office at the Queenscliff railway station.

Ticket office at the Queenscliff railway station

Irony abounds in the sight of this old fashioned ticket office. I purchased my ticket for the steam train online with my smart phone, and unable to print it out, the railway man had to read my details off said smart phone to record my journey! So much for doing things in the old way! However I did get a cute old school ticket to carry.

Return ticket to board the Queenscliff to Drysdale steam train

Return ticket to board the Queenscliff to Drysdale steam train

Permission to enter the railway station and wait for the train to depart!

Moving from the ticket office to the railway platform

Moving from the ticket office to the railway platform

Queenscliff railway station

Queenscliff railway station

Here’s the train waiting to take on passengers and convey them to Drysdale

Steam engine puffing away ready to take off

Steam engine puffing away ready to take off

Steam engine with the engineers getting ready to depart

Steam engine with the engineers getting ready to depart

Carriages waiting with open doors for passengers to board

Carriages waiting with open doors for passengers to board

Finally eleven o’clock!! All aboard!

Time to depart - all aboard!

Time to depart – all aboard!

Time to pick the best place to sit for the best view!

Time to pick the best place to sit for the best view!

View from the carriage out the door waiting for the station master to shut us in

View from the carriage out the door waiting for the station master to shut us in

The station master closing all the doors for departure

The station master closing all the doors for departure

And we are off! Following the shore of Swan Bay then crossing inland to Drysdale

Perfection! Blue skies, green grass, trees and through it all the gorgeous Swan Bay

Perfection! The view from my seat in the train: blue skies, green grass, trees and through it all the gorgeous Swan Bay

The inside of the 1920s carriage

The inside of the 1920s carriage

Some days, life is just perfect! Comfy seat, train doing all the work, view to boot!

Some days, life is just perfect! Comfy seat, train doing all the work, view to boot!

First stop, Laker’s Siding

Lakers Siding railway station

Lakers Siding railway station

Second stop, Suma Park (bad photo!)

Suma Park railway station

Suma Park railway station

Third and final stop, Drysdale. Beautiful station opposite Lake Lorne, home of some great birds!

Behind of Drysdale railway station

Behind of Drysdale railway station

Purple Swamphens at the Drysdale railway station

Purple Swamphens at the Drysdale railway station

A beautiful Black Swan, a Eurasian Coot and some ducks opposite Drysdale railway station

A beautiful Black Swan, a Eurasian Coot and some ducks opposite Drysdale railway station

Cormorants roosting in an old tree in Lake Lorne opposite the Drysdale railway station

Cormorants roosting in an old tree in Lake Lorne opposite the Drysdale railway station

What a great trip! I can highly recommend the steam train trip between Queenscliff and Drysdale; if you’re in the area, make sure you take the time to enjoy this old school adventure 🙂

Babies

In all the world there is nothing cuter than babies. Maybe not immediately after they are born or hatched or emerge into the world, but once they’ve recovered from the shock of being shoved into the world without so much as a user’s guide or map of life, there is nothing cuter.

Something about miniature versions of ourselves is touching. Maybe it’s the thought of ourselves once being that little and realising how far we’ve come, or maybe it’s the picture of a young, untouched, unburdened little thing with all the hope of the world in front of it.

Whatever it is, I’ve always been a fan. I started with puppies and progressed to ducklings and lately I’ve kind of come around to enjoying human babies too. It helps that my friends have such adorable, cute and clever babies. Or am I just biased?

But the baby I’m talking about today is something different, and so special because I’ve never seen it before and I think that it is probably a rare sight given the protection that these babies are usually given by their cautious parents.

I’m talking about plovers. That’s what we call them, and that is the type of bird that they are, but their bird name is Masked Lapwing, specifically the eastern form of this species.

Adults are not hard to find and in fact can become quite a nuisance during breeding season because they nest on the ground and will go to great lengths to keep you away from their nest! They try to distract you by loud shrill cries, by making a big fuss as they flap away from the nest pretending to be injured, and by swooping unfortunate people going about their business but happening to be passing by a nest.

This is what the adult looks like in the eastern parts of Australia, this particular one found in Queenscliff:

Eastern Masked Lapwing stalking around in the freshly mowed grass

Eastern Masked Lapwing stalking around in the freshly mowed grass

This is the cutest little miniature version, found in Lake Lorne in Drysdale this afternoon:

First glimpse of the cutest miniature ever: Masked Lapwing

First glimpse of the cutest miniature ever: Masked Lapwing

Cute puffy little eastern Masked Lapwing in the lake

Cute puffy little eastern Masked Lapwing in the lake

Baby eastern Masked Lapwing at Lake Lorne

Baby eastern Masked Lapwing at Lake Lorne

Beautiful baby eastern Masked Lapwing

Beautiful baby eastern Masked Lapwing

Two cute little miniature Masked Lapwings, already able to fly

Two cute little miniature Masked Lapwings, already able to fly!

So cute, right? I’m so happy to have found them! Ah bird watching, something new and interesting every time!!

Swan Bay

Yesterday morning we took a walk around Swan Bay in Queenscliff. The morning had been pretty chilly and there was still a brisk wind off the water as we headed off around the waterside walking track.

The upside of a chilly morning is the clear sunny day that follows; perfect for bird watching and taking photos and just being out and about!

I didn’t see quite as many birds as I had hoped, however a lot of birds were far over on little islands of sea grass or tidal mud so although they were there, we didn’t get a good look.

I really need to look into getting a pair of more powerful binoculars. I already know mine are terrible, but just need to get out and look for my next pair; they would make a huge difference!

Pair of Crimson Rosellas walking the spouting of a nearby house

Pair of Crimson Rosellas walking the spouting of a nearby house

Beautiful duck in the wetlands: Pacific Black, Australian Shoveler or Australian Grey Teal??

Beautiful duck in the wetlands: Pacific Black, Australasian Shoveler or Australian Grey Teal??

Australian White Ibis poking around in the shallows

Australian White Ibis poking around in the shallows

White-faced Heron in the Swan Bay

White-faced Heron in the Swan Bay

Australian Pied Oystercatcher amongst the sea grass

Australian Pied Oystercatcher amongst the sea grass

Stunning Crimson Rosella in the bushes

Stunning Crimson Rosella in the bushes

Beautiful crimson and light blue colours of the Crimson Rosella

Beautiful crimson and light blue colours of the Crimson Rosella

Group of male and female Chestnut Teal ducks in the sea grass

Group of male and female Chestnut Teal ducks in the sea grass

Fabulous blue male Superb Fairy-wren on the path in front of us

Fabulous blue male Superb Fairy-wren on the path in front of us

Pretty female Superb Fairy-wren edging out of the bushes next to the path

Pretty female Superb Fairy-wren edging out of the bushes next to the path

New Holland Honeyeaters thronging through these yellow bushes

New Holland Honeyeaters thronging through these yellow bushes

New Holland Honeyeater dangling down into a flower

New Holland Honeyeater dangling down into a flower

Immature New Holland Honeyeater preening on a branch

Immature New Holland Honeyeater preening on a branch

Group of Little Pied Cormorants drying off on the shore

Group of Little Pied Cormorants drying off on the shore

Royal Spoonbills swishing their bills for dinner

Royal Spoonbills swishing their bills for dinner

Another yellow bush, another New Holland Honeyeater

Another yellow bush, another New Holland Honeyeater

Caught in mid twirl: New Holland Honeyeater dancing around

Caught in mid twirl: New Holland Honeyeater dancing around

Australian Magpie in the grass

Australian Magpie in the grass

Group of Australian Grey Teal ducks resting on Swan Bay

Group of Australian Grey Teal ducks resting on Swan Bay