Canberra Day 89

[Friday 9th December]

Time is getting short here, and a weekend trip back down to Melbourne is going to make it shorter, but we wouldn’t miss it for anything. Hubby’s grandmother passed away at the start of the week and the funeral is this coming Monday so tonight we’re piling into our brother and sister-in-laws dual cab for the 7.5 hour trip south. It’s the least we can do to pay our final public love and respect. And we’re looking forward to being with hubby’s family, we miss them so much more at a time like this. It’s not sad that she is gone, in that we wouldn’t wish her back in her age, health, memory state but we’ll always miss her. I realise at this time that I’ve failed in my essential duty of letting many of my good people know that she has gone…I’m sorry! It’s mostly because it never occurred to me until the funeral; brain fade!

Since we’re going home for a bit anyway, and I have so much stuff (his words, not mine), I’m packing a few bags to take with me. You know, pharmacy reading I was going to get through, a cross stitch I was going to start, a sketch pad I never opened, a photo album I was going to go through and caption, books, clothes I won’t need, most of my shoes etc. Plus a few little purchases; I tried to keep it few and small. And its that time already, time to make a few coffee/lunch dates to say goodbye to my new friends! Nooo! Not already.

On today’s ticket? The amazing Versailles exhibition at the National Gallery of Australia. It’s only showing in Canberra, so lucky me! I know NOTHING about Versailles, except from the ads: gold, gold, more gold, marble, flowers and I hear there’s a special perfume! So what better way to take it in than a guided tour? This is opening day, probably not an ideal day to see it but I haven’t got that many days left so gotta go for it. I realise as I arrive at the National Gallery that I should have come here ages ago! There’s so much else to see apart from this exhibition; I’ll have to try and get back here. The tour was an audio one with the guide speaking quietly into a mic and the followers listening through headphones; good idea since there were multiple tours running and lots of people everywhere. The guide was amazing, she knew so much and spouted off all the dates and history like she’d done it a hundred times before even though it was day one. And the exhibition was magnificent!! There WAS a special perfume designed specifically for this exhibition! It was constantly sprayed through the entrance hall of the exhibition to give the impression of the massive gardens surrounding the palace of Versailles and the gazillion orange trees that lined the 100 something metre hall leading into the main palace. Some people smelled orange blossom, I smelled roses. Either way, what a cool device for an exhibition, engaging your sense of smell as well as sight!

So what did we see? So many beautiful paintings, either from the palace, or of the time and people from Versailles and France, all in such massive, elaborate, golden, carved frames that would do my grandma’s decorating style proud. Then the real things: enormous floor rugs, gorgeous gold and glass vases, furniture, clothing, a room immersing you in a 3D experience of the elaborate irrigation system in place for the Versailles garden which was demanded by one of the Louis’ despite the palace being basically in the desert. The history of the 3 Louis’ of the Versailles palace was also fascinating to me, having never heard any of it before. A brilliant exhibition; highly recommended! I did manage to sneak back another time and it was worth; so much detail to take in!

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An amazing photograph of the main hall of the palace of Versailles giving a glimpse into the decadent era that began with the reign of the Louis’ – the 2 foreground statues are replicas of the original. There were something like 373 mirrors along this hallway paired with windows on the other side

Then another little experience: a 2.5 km walking tour of Lake Burley Griffin with a guide talking about the history of Canberra and the lake. It’s a free thing that the tourist board do, so of course I have to do it! Never pass a freebie, me. We looked at the globe of the world inscribed with all the consulates in Canberra, the Menzies statue which is REALLY tall, the armed forces monument, the dead police  persons, the island, the musical tower. To be honest, I’ve done that many laps of the lake on my bike, plus the boat cruise, plus other tours that this one was a bit superfluous! Oh well. It’s done. But in a bit of a weird format, the tour is one way. It ends 2.5km from the start. And then you have to walk back again under your own steam! Bummer! Oh well, get trudging.

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Canberra Day Thirteen

How can you not have a wonderful day when it starts with these gorgeous flowers and this much sunshine?? I am so loving the flower festival Floriade. It’s been open for 7 days and this is my third visit; YAY for free entry! This would never happen in Melbourne. And YAY for fantastic weather every few days that makes it such a pleasure to be alive and out in the sunshine soaking up the beauty of flowers; you know, in between the rain! And YAY for being well enough so that I actually feel joy and enjoyment of things, rather than hating the sunlight and covering my head in my doona. When the chemicals are balanced, magic happens! So as always I want to enthusiastically recommend my psychiatrist whose knowledge and skill has gotten me from not wanting to live life to loving life! If that isn’t a miracle…

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I don’t have much of a garden myself in Melbourne but I do love gardens. My hubby will tell you that I like the IDEA of a garden more than the actual gardening behind the garden. I tend to love high maintenance flowers but want a low maintenance garden filled with high maintenance flowers. It doesn’t really  work out…so currently I have a variety of succulents and geraniums, all pretty die hard stuff that I never water or feed or tend to in any way. But they flower for me which is delightful. And the rest of the time I get my fix from other people’s or public gardens. Today I got my fix from the ferris wheel, a great idea given by a friend. It really gives you an idea of the patterns of the gardens and just how awesome the whole garden is.

What else did I do with my day besides admiring flowers and taking another hundred or so photos of flowers? I went for another bike ride: 21km this time around the western (=hilly) and central (=flat) loops of Lake Burley Griffin; got some overdue blood tests done by another of the seemingly all grumpy phebotomists; chatted to my grandma on the phone for her birthday (one of the major things I miss about Melbourne!); got some scripts dispensed; mailed a couple of postcards; got some groceries; had a nap. Just another day. But another day where I enjoyed life and put in an effort to live life to the full. It’s a beautiful thing.

Canberra Day Ten

There’s something about “having” to get going in the morning to take hubby to work that really keeps me going and it’s working well. Actually, until his new workplace provide him with an ID and access to the change rooms (I mean its only been 7 workdays!), he’s been given authority to charge a cab to and from work. But I asked if I could still take him in of a morning, because it’s really working for me. And why tamper with a willing system?

I took my bike AGAIN today, two days in a row, and did the same combination of central loop/eastern loop of the Lake Burley Griffin bike path. I love that lake every time I see it: it’s so scenic, and rich with birds, and history. Not to be caught out with my camera twice, I slung it over my shoulder and headed off. Not the best set up but it worked well enough. It was pretty chilly but I had my camera and my bike and I was excited! Anticipation is so powerful. I guess it’s like hope, in a way. And hope is probably the most powerful counter balance to mental illness.

I got my photos of the NINE ducklings. YAY! Hope fulfilled. Plus unexpectedly another family of ELEVEN ducklings!! And TWO Masked Lapwing (previously Plover) chicks!!! And a baby rabbit! And a baby Golden Whistler that was playfully flitting around the tree above my head. This paragraph hardly does justice to the joy, the bliss, and excitement, and happiness that all of this brings to me! It was a beautiful morning. Not only that but I recorded MORE species of birds this morning; FORTY FOUR up from THIRTY EIGHT yesterday, including a Double Barred Finch which was a LIFER for me; a bird that I’ve never come across before. That’s because it doesn’t occur naturally in Victoria – truly a bird for above the border.

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I had another fun jaunt at Floriade checking out the shopping stalls, trying one some clothes, tasting the honey donuts which were a terrific recommendation from a friend, and checking out the flowers. I can already see some tulips starting to fall apart, and others popping up and starting to unfold. I can see how a week can make for a total change in the gardens. I still haven’t tried the ferris wheel, but I will.

You must check out my website for Spring Babies!

And for some photos of the beautiful Lake Burley Griffin check out Bike Ride and Baby Shower and Morning Lake Burley Griffin Drive.

The end

A medication order comes to the dispensary late in the day. It’s from the adult psychiatric ward, who only have an attending clinical pharmacist for half of the day, and a pager service for the rest of the day. Because the order is up to the 7th day and the bottom of the page is initialed by ward pharmacists from 3 different days that show they have reviewed the whole chart, it seems straight forward to supply with no need to page the busy ward pharmacist. Especially as the last initial was from the day prior. This shows me that all of the  work has been done to make sure the order is safe, appropriate, avoids their allergies, is monitored as necessary and is okay with all of the other medications. Not a lot of people see the work that pharmacists do to keep them safe while they’re in hospital, but those 2 letters at the bottom of the medication chart mean a great deal!

I go to dispense the medication in our software, and it comes up that the patient is in the oncology ward! Confusing, since the order clearly has the psych ward written on it. So I ask the oncology pharmacist and get a story like no other that I’ve heard yet!

This patient has met SCLC. That’s medical shorthand for advanced lung cancer that was possibly incurable from the the start, most likely caused by smoking, which has spread from the lungs throughout the body via the blood stream and deposited in the usual place that lung cancer goes to: the brain. Isn’t medical terminology amazing? 7 letters that tell me all of that!!

When a cancer spreads the medical term is that it metastasises. The cancer clumps that have spread away from the primary, or first discovered/diagnosed cancer are known as metastases, shortened to mets. This patient has brain mets. The cancer has spread from the lungs into the bloodstream and traveled around the body before settling in the brain and growing there. This is now a secondary cancer because it has come from the primary cancer. We can prove this by taking samples of both cancers; they will have the same histology or cell type, and the same structure and growth pattern. Each type of cancer has a typical pattern of where the mets will appear. Patients with lung cancer will be screened for brain mets. Breast cancer patients will be scanned for bone mets and etc.

I sometimes hear or read of people saying that a person has breast cancer and bone cancer and brain cancer, as though they were 3 different types. The odds of that are really absurb; it’s a once in a lifetime patient sort of odds. Much more likely, it’s breast cancer which has spread to the bone and then the brain. That’s nothing to do with the anything, just something that I’d like people to know.

SO getting back to the story! Our patient has advanced, likely to be life-ending lung cancer that has spread throughout the body and has established in the brain. At this point they cannot be cured of their cancer without very extensive surgery to remove the cancerous lung and brain tissue, and severe chemotherapy and radiation therapy…and even then it’s doubtful! And its a very high cost to pay, especially removing part or all of the lung/s and part of the brain!! Brain and lung surgery? And possible transplant to replace them? for no guarantee? It would be a very brave doctor to recommend that course of treament, unless the patient were very young and fit…which is unlikely given this cancer is caused by smoking.

So at this point we offer palliative care, or end-of-life care, or comfort care. Or try to.

Usually we try to get the patient back home with the appropriate supports of doctors visits to the home or at their usual clinic, nursing care in the home if the patient can’t do for themselves, plenty of medications and basically whatever it is that they’d most like to fill their final days or weeks or months with. If they can’t be sent home we at least give them a private room, unlimited family visits, their little dog/cat coming in, vases for flowers, unobtrusive nursing care and medications, comforting doctors rounds, limiting anything not fully essential like blood tests or blood pressure checks, and again, basically whatever they want that is feasible.

Once we had a wedding, in the patient’s garden around the side with the couples children and close family then day leave and permission for one alcoholic beverage. She died 3 days later at 40 something. Everyone cried about the wedding, either at it, or thinking about it, or seeing her come in from home in her wedding dress on oxygen holding her kids hands.

I’ve seen patients is deep distress changing completely when their little dog is brought in. They coo and talk to it, cuddle it, put their face next to it, and just relax so much. It’s such a tear jerking experience! The change in them, that peace, all that matters is they’ve seen their little dog and it’s going to be okay, and all is okay with the patient somehow.

But in this case, that isn’t going to be an option as such. In this unfortunate patient, the cancerous growth of the brain mets has set off a full blown psychosis! The pressure of  the extra growth onto the brain stretching the brain sac, the location of the mets pushing on certain areas of the brain, physical and chemical changes etc can cause different symptoms like confusion, delerium but I’ve never heard of this before. Think hallucinations, delusions, aggression and violence…such that the oncology ward wasn’t able to deal with the patient anymore and they’ve been sent to the psych ward! That’s not the place for comfort care, for a nice big room with flowers and family spending quality time at the end of life. Instead it’ll be sedation, anti-psychotics, possibly restraints, surrounded by other disturbed patients in an environment that’s hardly welcoming.

And that’s how little control we have over the end of our lives.

Medical conditions eventually get us all, one way or another. I think we should recognise that. We will all die of a medical condition, and can I add, or mental health condition. And we don’t have a lot of control over any of it!

Now it’s full psychosis as a result of lung cancer as a result of smoking.

It might be kidney failure and second daily dialysis as a result of diabetes as a result of a fatty diet.

It might be suicide as a result of desperation as a result of depression.

Where is the control?

So wouldn’t it be nice if we thought of them all the same?

I would love to live in a world where no one ever described death by suicide as selfish.

Because if we can call suicide selfish, what on earth would we call the death due to smoking or a bad diet?? We feel very emotional about the unfairness and randomness of cancer, but is that really in line with how we think about suicide? Depression can be very random and is never fair. It distresses us to see patients on dialysis and in the inevitable spiral to death that comes with kidney disease, but isn’t that just exactly how we could describe the progress of an unwell patient with insufficiently treated depression?

I’d prefer there be no blame on anyone.

As a fatty who is struggling to exercise and diet through her medication haze and bipolar up and down blips, am I really going to say I told you so to diabetes, high cholesterol, and all the consequences thereof, stroke, heart attack, high blood pressure, kidney failure to name a few?

As a depressive who has spent 3 years trying, trying, trying through all the low mood, low motivation, low energy, low self esteem, low interest, low care and everything that comes in that huge big black box, I certainly can never blame anyone who just couldn’t take it anymore, and doesn’t know how else to escape but through death.

The smoking one I’m still in debate with myself over. I guess because I’ve never smoked and I’ve never had to quit, I can much more easily see why it’s a bad idea. However, my judgement is reserved for those who didn’t know it was bad when they took up the habit. People who grew up in my era (can I call it an era yet?) know it’s bad, and took it up anywhere. But again, because my mind sees all angles, I realise that there could still be a lot of factors as to why they did take it up: parents who smoked, peer pressure left over from the 90s, depression/anxiety, and a bunch more. Point being, I don’t think you should smoke but I do know it can be incredibly hard to stop, just like the gym is something I should do and find hard to!

My aim for us all: let’s work together to realise that in the end, we quit, we exercise, we try, but that’s not a guarantee, just a higher likelihood of control.

 

Twitchers Thursday

What a gorgeous day in lovely Melbourne!

reflection, blue sky, Glorious glorious day! A lake on Monbulk Creek in Birdsland Reserve

Glorious glorious day! A lake on Monbulk Creek in Birdsland Reserve

From this end of the day it was a delightful day of friendship, flowers, birds, lunching, sunshine, shopping, driving, discovery and fulfilment.

I love this magenta and red flower, which is yes, surprisingly, a native!

I love this magenta and red flower, which is yes, surprisingly, a native!

Amazing how different it looks when compared to the other end which was a disappointed ‘oh it’s grey outside, it was meant to be sunny’, an exhausted-after-eight-hours-of-sleep ‘I’m so tired, maybe I’ll just keep sleeping a bit longer’, slow-and-fat ‘I don’t know if I’m going to be able to keep up with the physical demands of the day’ and just-to-give-me-a-boost ‘ooh chocolate, good I wasn’t sure what to have for breakfast’!

Perspective. It never ceases to amaze me! It really is everything!

Still a favourite but thought I was onto a new one! Never heard it call like that

Still a favourite but thought I was onto a new one! Never heard it call like that. From this side you miss all the pretty yellow that makes him striking.

Convincing myself to get out of bed for myself in the morning? Very easy to pike and say, well there’s no shortage of days – I’ll get up tomorrow, or the day after!

Knowing that someone else is waiting? ‘You better get up right now and get yourself sorted this instance Miss’!

In a good way, not a bad way. In a spirit of wanting to be with your friends and getting some motivation out of that, not in a spirit of ‘I have to because they said so’.

Fabulous red and orange kangaroo paw - gorgeous isn't it?

Fabulous red and orange kangaroo paw – gorgeous isn’t it?

The same goes for the level of exertion I can put out by myself versus with someone else, or for something else. Yesterday I slow walked 1.5km in 2 hours…not exactly race speed! Today we covered 2.5km in the same or less time, with multiple stops and pauses for birds and beautiful scenery gazing. Still not race speed but a good deal quicker than it would have been if I’d set the pace myself. Again, this is a good thing – it helps me get going to have someone by my side. It might wear me out, but that’s good too 🙂

Tadpoles! Millions of them! Haven't seen them for years, very alert little tiny things, lake, reeds

Tadpoles! Millions of them! Haven’t seen them for years, very alert little tiny things

Something to keep in mind for myself.

As they say, it’s all in the mind! Great saying that, encompasses everything and is both positive and negative at the same time!

Fluffy headed Laughing Kookaburra preening high in the sky over Kuranga Nursery

Fluffy headed Laughing Kookaburra preening high in the sky over Kuranga Nursery

So today we checked out the fabulous native Kuranga Nursery in Mount Evelyn which was a pure delight! Masses of flowering wildflowers and a real education for me in what exactly is meant by the term native plant…so much more than I had thought! So many types of eucalypt, huge numbers of banksias and every colour of Kangaroo Paw. Fascinating! Plus ferns and other plants which I had always assumed were English or European.

Every possible colour of Kangaroo Paw - forgive me for thinking there were two!

Every possible colour of Kangaroo Paw – forgive me for thinking there were two!

They have an AMAZING cafe onsite and we had a fabulous outdoor table in the shade overlooking the nursery and ate a delicious lunch with delectable dessert! They use native ingredients in their cooking and we thoroughly enjoyed every bite!

Our fabulous view from lunch on the most perfect Summer day, colourful

Our fabulous view from lunch on the most perfect Summer day

Pretty flowers attract pretty butterflies and moths - not sure which this is, green leaves

Pretty flowers attract pretty butterflies and moths – not sure which this is

Our next stop had been debated and was decided mostly based on my ability/inability to actually make the most of the originally planned destination: Cranbourne Botanic, or Australian Native Garden. We decided to skip it, we were running shortish on time anyway, and instead we checked out a brand new area for both of us: Birdsland Reserve, Belgrave.

Playing Peekaboo with a Sulfur Crested Cockatoo!

Playing Peekaboo with a Sulfur Crested Cockatoo!

Early into the piece we discovered that this reserve was named Birdsland after a family named Bird who used to live there – its literally named Bird’s Land after them. I thought that maybe this diminished the chance of us seeing birds…but I was wrong! It is also aptly named for the birds there.

I was with an insect enthusiast today...and I think it's starting to show in my photos!, dead log

A long shot to a Dragon Fly, or Damsel Fly – not sure which

Here’s a handy hint if you’re planning to check it out (which you absolutely must if you’re a walker/runner/cyclist/nature enthusiast/bird watcher!). You’ll get to the sign for this reserve and find a car park. Don’t park there – turn up the gravel road and drive in for a few kilometres first; this will take you to the start of the good track (in my opinion, having visited once!).

This is a Damsel Fly - I can't really tell them apart from Dragon Flies so I'm going on trust, green grass

This is a Damsel Fly – I can’t really tell them apart from Dragon Flies so I’m going on trust what I’m told

It was such a beautiful day, weather-wise! Blue sky after lunch, warm sun, cool breeze, dry conditions. Could hardly have ordered a better day for being out and about. Much better for hot, sweaty me than the expected 30 degrees of tomorrow! I do need to look into getting a visor, though; may have gotten a touch too much of the sun.

Nothing nicer than sitting in companionable silence on a shady seat watching the perfect day roll by!

And then back to the bird searching. We managed to find two birds we’d never seen or photographed and it was a great day before that! We heard the Reed-warbler early and my friend caught a few glimpses but so far I’d seen nothing! We really didn’t want to leave without a photo but he made use work for it! The other bird was an incidental ‘oh there’s an easy shot of a bird!” moment, but I’m pretty happy with it!

So here’s my two lifers! Not bad for one day! Thanks to my friend with the sharpest eyes!

A White-eared Honeyeater flitting around in the dead trees on a perfect day at Birdsland Reserve

A White-eared Honeyeater flitting around in the dead trees on a perfect day at Birdsland Reserve

An Australian Reed-Warbler that lives up to it's name to a high degree, confounding us often by disappearing into the thick reeds and singing his heart out

An Australian Reed-Warbler that lives up to it’s name to a high degree, confounding us often by disappearing into the thick reeds and singing his heart out

I also have to give a shout out for my friend for sharing her insect knowledge with me. I loved shooting them, but I think my head is too full of birds and flowers to add insects just now! But it added some fun to the day.

So, a happy day. How ’bout that? Didn’t think I’d have a great day like that this week so it’s pretty awesome! Cheers!

Wild flower

[Edit, 14th August 2015: in order to keep this blog going and to keep showing you my photos, I’ve had to make room otherwise I’ll be all full up and writing you essays every time! Thanks for your understanding, as I delete all of these flower photos!]

Okay so you know how I’m just like a teensy tiny eeny weeny little bit obsessed with birds? With hearing them, finding them, seeing them, photographing etc?

Well nothing about that has changed but I’m adding a bit of variety into the mix.

For nearly four years, since hubby and I took a trip to Perth and southern Western Australia over the New Year break in 2010/1, I have wanted to go back there during the wild flower season which is famous world wide. I even booked it into my hard copy calendar on the wall for the following year, but before the dates came around we moved house and the calendar was abandoned to a box in the shed and the idea was forgotten.

Until this year. We received a Save The Date card in August for a family wedding just outside of Perth in Swan Valley for the end of October! Eeek! Right at the tail end of the wildflower season!! YAY!!!

So I jumped right into research mode: what species of flowers would be flowering, in what areas, at what time in the season, where would be best to see them, who operated tours in the right areas. Typical over-organisation, but it’s fun so where’s the harm, right?

As well as my own research, I took the topic to my last photography class and quizzed my teacher (Wendy Clark – Empathy Photographics, Master Your Camera) on photographing miniature flowers, seeing as she is an expert in photographing wild native orchids: lighting, sun and shade, getting up close, use of zoom, getting the colour right, time of day etc.

So excitingly, the right place for sighting and photographing wildflowers at the end of October is right in Perth and southern Western Australia, exactly where we’ll be! As well as hanging out with my husband’s family in Perth I have a lot of family to visit down south as far as Bunbury so I feel like the stars have aligned for wildflower hunting and photography! Awesome!

I’ve looked up all the tours, but Kings Park in the centre of Perth has an amazing display of wildflowers apparently, and some of my family have paddocks of wildflowers next to their properties so I’m going to get my fill there and if I still need some more flowers then I’ll book once I’m there.

So why am I writing all this blah blah? Because I’m about to throw a bazillion practice photos at you *evil smile* I’ve been practicing in the gardens of my neighbours, in the park, at the awesome holiday house my mum and dad (and me and hubby some of the time) just stayed in for a week courtesy of the Otis Foundation at Wattle Point, on Raymond Island, in the Blond Bay game reserve, on the silt jetties outside of Paynesville, Bluff lookout…essentially anytime I find a flower that might be native, or any flower really, and have my camera nearby.

I’m trying to focus on native flowers, but as it happens, I don’t really know which flowers are native and which have been imported. I mean some are obvious, like I know gum flowers and heath and wild orchids are Australian, and willow trees and camelias and holly are from England, but that’s about the whole of my knowledge! So I’m in the market for a field guide, some more experience and maybe a tiny version of a tripod for getting those awkward shots.

In the meantime, here are the flowers from my holiday out East to tantalise us for the West!

Apparently this beautiful flower is called

Apparently this beautiful flower is called “Pig Face”! It’s also pink not magenta, but I couldn’t make my camera agree!

Beautiful purple flowering vine on the lemon version of

Beautiful purple flowering vine on the lemon version of “Pig Face”

Pink flowering gum blossoming out of gumnuts

Pink flowering gum blossoming out of gumnuts

We all fell in LOVE with these gorgeous blue flowers that creep as a vine into other bushes and trees

We all fell in LOVE with these gorgeous blue flowers that creep as a vine into other bushes and trees

Our pretty state emblem, the Heath bell flowers

Our pretty state emblem, the Heath bell flowers

Lovely small little yellow flowers

Lovely small little yellow flowers

Another in the trillions of white star flowers - its amazing how different each one is!

Another in the trillions of white star flowers – its amazing how different each one is!

I love how these white star flowers have little divets cut in between

I love how these white star flowers have little divets cut in between

Very Christmasy native with all the delicate scrolls and bobbles

Very Christmasy native with all the delicate scrolls and bobbles

A fabulous Christmas coloured Kangaroo Paw, definitely Australian!

A fabulous Christmas coloured Kangaroo Paw, definitely Australian!

A weird knobbly kind of flower on a green bush

A weird knobbly kind of flower on a green bush

A fascinating kind of Grevillea flower, all spikes and yellow nobbles

A fascinating kind of Grevillea flower, all spikes and yellow nobbles

A pink variation on the cotton candy bush where the flower bursts out of the nut

A pink variation on the cotton candy bush where the flower bursts out of the nut

Lovely pink Melaleuca flowers, a childhood favourite of mine - love how they cover the whole bush

Lovely pink Melaleuca flowers, a childhood favourite of mine – love how they cover the whole bush

Delightful masses of tiny pink flowers growing off spikes

Delightful masses of tiny pink flowers growing off spikes

Gorgeous pea flower growing prolifically! Fabulous colour!

Gorgeous pea flower growing prolifically! Fabulous colour!

This pretty pea flower is apparently called the egg and bacon bush! What?!

This pretty pea flower is apparently called the egg and bacon bush! What?!

More star flowers than I can count! This time they are mauve

More star flowers than I can count! This time they are mauve

Another pretty purple hibiscus flower

Another pretty purple hibiscus flower

Lovely spike of tiny pink flowers

Lovely spike of tiny pink flowers

Christmas bells! Hope they last til the festive season

Christmas bells! Hope they last til the festive season

Yellow button flowers clustering together

Yellow button flowers clustering together

Pretty pretty white star flowers with cute baubles

Pretty pretty white star flowers with cute baubles

How much do these gorgeous flowers look like butterflies?

How much do these gorgeous flowers look like butterflies?

A cute littlepurple paper mache type pom pom flower

A cute little purple paper mache type pom pom flower

fabulously intricate white flower with yellow stamens

fabulously intricate white flower with yellow stamens

If you look closely you see that there is a long thin red and yellow stem coming out of the centre of this tiny star flower

If you look closely you see that there is a long thin red and yellow stem coming out of the centre of this tiny star flower

White ringed yellow centred pink daisy - so pretty!

White ringed yellow centred pink daisy – so pretty!

A cotton wool type flowering popping out of a nut

A cotton wool type flowering popping out of a nut

Another Christmas like delight unfurling from a tight little bud

Another Christmas like delight unfurling from a tight little bud

Another spiky bobbly Christmassy flower

Another spiky bobbly Christmassy flower

All I can think of looking at these flowers is false eyelashes

All I can think of when looking at these flowers is false eyelashes

A funny bobbly seed pod: not sure if it was a flower or always a pod

A funny bobbly seed pod: not sure if it was a flower or always a pod

Chewed on yellow centred yellow daisy with creepy crawlies

Chewed on yellow centred yellow daisy with creepy crawlies

Don't know what these yellow centred star fllowers are but they're cute

Don’t know what these yellow centred star fllowers are but they’re cute

Orange dotted purple centred washed out orange daisy

Orange dotted purple centred washed out orange daisy

White sprigs of blossom, perfect for a vase

White sprigs of blossom, perfect for a vase

A gorgeous yellow sprig of star flowers on a ridiculously long and fragile stem - hard to capture blowing in the wind!

A gorgeous yellow sprig of star flowers on a ridiculously long and fragile stem – hard to capture blowing in the wind!

I call these cotton ball flowers - no idea what they actually are

I call these cotton ball flowers – no idea what they actually are

Cutesy little rose like flower bursting out of little nuts

Cutesy little rose like flower bursting out of little nuts

Yellow centred purple daisy standing out by itself, bank, green plant

Yellow centred purple daisy standing out by itself

Purple centred peachy coloured daisy

Purple centred peachy coloured daisy

Delightful little purple flowers giving colour to a grey bush

Delightful little purple flowers giving colour to a grey bush

fabulously tiny and petite purple flowers growing on a bush

Fabulously tiny and petite purple flowers growing on a bush

Cape weed - an introduced pest but it does look spectacular in the springtime

Cape weed – an introduced pest but it does look spectacular in the springtime

Lovely yellow centred white ringed pink daisy...just a tad chomped on by rogue bunny rabbits

Lovely yellow centred white ringed pink daisy…just a tad chomped on by rogue bunny rabbits

Lovely trumpet type flower, pale pink on the outside, maroon on the inside

Lovely trumpet type flower, pale pink on the outside, maroon on the inside

Pretty white 4 sided star flower in a bunch

Pretty white 4 sided star flower in a bunch

Delightful white daisy with pink dots - the bush is amazing!

Delightful white daisy with pink dots – the bush is amazing!

Lovely double sided crinkle edged yellow flower

Lovely double sided crinkle edged yellow flower

Teensy tiny itty bitty purple flowers on a grass bush

Teensy tiny itty bitty purple flowers on a grass bush

Fabulous yellow centred yellow daisies - such a prolific flowering plant

Fabulous yellow centred yellow daisies – such a prolific flowering plant

Pretty pretty pretty - a lovely yellow centred white daisy

Pretty pretty pretty – a lovely yellow centred white daisy

Not sure what it is but love the green-red contrast and delicate flower

Not sure what it is but love the green-red contrast and delicate flower

Blue and yellow centred white daisy

Blue and yellow centred white daisy

Looks like the other pink pea flower but this is a bush, not a tree

Looks like the other pink pea flower but this is a bush, not a tree

Beautiful bunch of white star flowers

Beautiful bunch of white star flowers

Lovely purple hibiscus flower, paper thin but surprisingly lasting

Lovely purple hibiscus flower, paper thin but surprisingly lasting

Pretty little blue star growing out of a grass bush

Pretty little blue star growing out of a grass bush