Footy season

It’s the start of the footy season.

Did you know that, or care if you did?

Melbourne overall is supposed to be pretty footy mad, and I’m sure it is based on the shenanigans I saw in my work suburb of Richmond over the footy finals last year, but I’m fairly laid back about it. We’ve never had a telly which is probably the major reason why I’ve never followed the footy that much, but if we’re ever on holidays during the footy season I do get pretty enthusiastic watching the play and exclaiming and yelling and carrying on! Who me? Yes me! But following it by newspaper just doesn’t interest me. I’ve also only ever been to 2 games, neither involving my club so…I guess that hasn’t piqued my interest. Theoretically I barrack for Richmond footy club, ironic given I now work there, mostly cos that’s who my Dad barracks for but as soon as people start talking to me about players or games or stats I get lost…except Dustin Martin, I know Dustin Martin. So how about my Dad barracking for Richmond without a telly? The Saturday afternoon clean out of the work van!! The radio would go on, the Coke cans and pie wrappers would actually get removed from the passenger seat foot well, and all the paraphernalia of being an electrician (clippings of conduits, cable ties, old light globes, fuses and things that I’ve forgotten the names of) get methodically cleaned out and the van sorted out for the week ahead. Or a trip to the tip. Or cutting firewood, or taking other trips, or something. Anything, from memory.

So, footy season…why do I now care? Apart from catching a couple of good games over the Easter break when we stayed down at Fairhaven, I work Saturdays in the emergency department. Turns out, we (I mean the hospital I work for) have the contract for the AFL among other sports contracts like the Australian Open so we get injured (and famous!) players coming through our doors, as well as all kinds of junior league and general patients. We’re the only private ED in the city so people wanting fast turnaround, quick (often same day) access to orthopaedics or plastics, private facilities and considerate treatment of celebrities often come to us. Of course there’s still patient confidentiality procedures in place so I won’t be discussing patients by name…and anyway no AFL players came in today to my knowledge, at least not between 10am and 2pm. Who knows after that?

So what did I see today? At least 4 patients lead through the department still in their playing jerseys with various signs of injury: limping, guarding of limbs, blood, pain.

A young 19yo male playing footy this morning went for a mark and the footy hit his ring finger at the tip resulting in a compound (bone through the skin) fracture of his finger…think blood, broken skin, broken bone, and just to top it off, the nurse swore she could see the tendon!! Ick! And when I saw him, he and his mum thought they were being discharged home…sorry, no, this is gonna need surgery!

A young girl maybe 16yo-ish came in from women’s AFL, not the major league but an amateur game with a dislocated shoulder. I actually felt worse for her than the last one because she has to be awake while they sort that out, although on reflection they wouldn’t knock out a patient to fix their finger, just a regional nerve block, probably in the wrist. She still had the green penthrane (inhaled anaesthetic) whistle from the ambulance and after the first attempt to enlocate the shoulder and an enormous blood-curdling scream that shook the foundations, they gave it back for her to suck on in between huge sobs which turned into a panic attack so they switched to nitrous oxide (laughing gas) to both treat the pain and anxiety, and eventually got the shoulder back in! I did not envy her at all! Not pretty.

I didn’t see this guy, but apparently a 57yo male umpire got tackled from behind during a junior game, huge question as to why that even happened, and is now feeling pain pretty much all over his whole body which got unbearable at home so he came into ED. I don’t know what they found in the end, but I’m sure most of the problem was a 57yo rather than a 22yo guy hitting the deck like a sack of potatoes. They don’t bounce back like they used to!

There was another jersey but I never caught up with that one. So instead, another trauma. This one was very unfortunate; I guess all traumas are but when your pet attacks you, its unfortunate. This 21yo guy’s pet is a lovely house cat. His buddy came over to visit and without his knowledge brought his dog. As soon as the dog stepped into the house it went for the cat, of course, so the guy went to pick up the cat but it was freaked out and attacked him…properly! Think slash to the throat, slash to the forearm and wrist, slash under the nose, slash on the chin, and the crowning glory, not just a slash to the lip but a chunk taken right out!! Ouch! Several stitches required, and being a private hospital, and being that the injury is to the face, usually we get a plastics specialist to review the patient at least, if not get them to do the stitches themselves, for a better aesthetic outcome!! Does that sound private hospital-ish?

Job update

Hello? Is anybody out there? Is anyone still listening?

Apologies for the radio silence over the last few months. It wasn’t for lack of ideas and thoughts to share, but more for lack of motivation and follow through. It’s been a long, cold winter for me! How about you?

The run-down of this winter is coming in instalments, because a lot has happened despite the long cold. First off, and the main event, an update on work.

I quit my old job in August, yep the same one that I started in April, and moved on to another job. I’ve never “given up” so soon! But it was a good move, probably the best career move I’ve ever made despite quitting being seen generally as a negative thing. Four months in community pharmacy, and I’m done! It wasn’t the community, it was the pharmacy, more specifically the management of the pharmacy, and more especially the owner/manager/slacker/ingrate/greedy pig/jerk. I’ve done that fight in a job once, and it changed the course of my mental health for life! This time, I knew enough not to stay, and I’m proud of that! It shows that I learnt something that first time around, and that’s a victory. As soon as I realised that the situation wasn’t going to change (another thing I’m proud of recognising this time around) and that my initiative was unappreciated, I started planning my departure.

And karma smiled. Well I don’t believe in karma, or the universe, or fate. But everything fell into place like it would if you did believe in one or the other of those things. I monitored the regular SEEK pharmacist job alerts that I’d signed up to receive before this job, as well as the Society of Hospital Pharmacists job register. I was still searching for my escape route (you know, never leave a job until you’ve got another job), when I got a call from Slade Pharmacy at Epworth Private Hospital in Richmond asking if I would like to interview for a casual position! Ah yes! I would definitely like to interview for a job with flexible hours in a hospital, albeit the dispensary! Especially since you called me; is this a dream come true? So why did they call me? Turns out that when I interviewed for them last year and didn’t get the job, they said “can we keep your resume on file?” and meant it! How about that? I thought it was just a line that everyone says when you don’t get a job as a consolation that maybe in the future there’ll be something there for you. But this time there’s an actual consolation prize in form of a job! Amazing.

So, interview, check. Job offer, check. Give notice that I’m leaving, check. Get obnoxious response from boss, check. Leave job feeling even better about my decision to leave, check. His response when I said I was leaving? “That’s a relief. Return the keys. Retail is not for you”! Sorry. You’re wrong. Retail pharmacy is for me, in fact during uni days I worked in retail pharmacy for 3 years and had a great time. But you’re right, the way you mis-manage it, it’s not for me. Ciao!

Usually when someone is looking for work, changing jobs, planning a career or whatnot, they consult their own needs and maybe that of a partner or family member. It comes down to what you want from a job, where you want to work, what you want to do in your job and that’s it. That’s true for me too, but in my case, there are a few other factors that contribute as well.

Number one: how will this job affect my health? That’s always the first consideration nowadays. Do you ever even think about this when considering a job? I certainly never did before I got sick. Could I work fulltime, could I manage the stress, how would I manage my workload? I never even thought about these as issues, I never thought about it period. I just knew inside myself that I would manage whatever came to me. I never doubted being able to do whatever job I got. I didn’t understand there being any option but doing the job well and going home to rest before going back the next day. Until the last year of my first job led to my physical health falling apart, and my mental health beginning to deteriorate. My second job was endlessly fulfilling but my mental health was already on the way out and too far gone for me to hold my head together, so I had to bow out. Ever since then I’ve been returning to work and thinking about what I can physically and mentally manage in a job.

Number two: what do my doctors think? Their opinion isn’t the end of the matter, but it has a lot of weight and sometimes it does decide the issue. My psychiatrist for instance has an old-school understanding of what hospital pharmacists do, but a very up-to-date understanding of how my previous jobs have affected my mental health. His current stipulation has been no hospitals, which of course I’ve found very challenging to accept! Hospitals are my place, I’m sure of it, but the politics of my first and third hospital jobs have been tough on my health for different reasons. So, I did what he suggested and tried retail pharmacy. I wasn’t very enthusiastic at first, but I tried to see it as a challenge, as a chance to update and broaden my drug knowledge and expand my mind with a different type of practice. But unfortunately, I found a great job in a terrible environment. I tried hard to make it work, but it began to drag me down after a couple of months and my psychiatrist could see that clearly, once referring to my ex-boss as Frankenstein’s brother, and another time as a peasant which amused me greatly! But still, when I broached my new job at Slade Pharmacy with him, I went cautiously and emphasised the words dispensary, retail, community pharmacy, and minimised the word hospital. But as it turns out, that first job as a casual dispensary pharmacist starting in September was easy to sell. Meanwhile my GP is supportive of anything that I want to put my hand to, even recommending I just not work for a while longer if it suited me. But getting back to work has always been a driving force with me, for better or for worse.

A week into my casual dispensary role, I heard someone dropping the words job and emergency department!! Wait!! What?? My favourite ever job so far! On offer right here? Where I already have a job? Ears pricked, senses heightened, on full alert I went into action finding out as much as I could. As soon as possible I interviewed for and was then offered later that week a role in the emergency department, 2 weeks into my casual dispensary position. I was more hesitant in telling my psychiatrist about that. I used words like part time, structured, working with another pharmacist, dedicated time, no involvement with the main hospital. But it went over easily. He saw how the community pharmacy thing went; we tried that. So now this is a new thing that I wanna try, and we’ll watch and wait this time.

The third and last factor is a third party checking in on the progress of my work. I’m receiving income protection payments from an insurer, and they check in on me every month. There’s a lot of filling in of forms by myself and my GP, supplying payslips when I’m working, and periodic check ins with a “rehabilitation consultant” who keeps tabs on my work and my health, and a case manager who keeps tabs generally. They do keep the pressure on to remain in paid work, of course, and they aim to get me back to full time work, something that I’m by no means convinced is possible. When I wasn’t happy in that retail job, I did experience some pressure from them to keep going rather than quit, but I was sure I was doing the right thing, and now in hindsight they agree. It’s just another little something in the mix that complicates my plans for what work I want to do and how I want to do it.