Point Cook

Friday 16th March, 2018

This one is for a patient from ED tonight who I had a great chat with about photography. No I wasn’t neglecting my work, there weren’t that many other patients to see at that point, and it’s my hobby…always happy to chat about it!

I learnt a lot! About camera clubs at a local, state, national and international level including one that I might go along to locally, we talked about his 3 dark rooms, I heard about UV and infrared photography, and we talked camera models, good lenses for bird photography…and we could have gone on!! But eventually work has to come to the fore.

Anyway, since I shared my blog but haven’t put up a lot of my photos later, I guess I better. These are some shots that I liked from an outing with Birdlife Australia, Melbourne branch to Point Cook on Wednesday. A great walk, perfect bushwalking weather, nice company and a few stunning and semi-co-operative birds! It all makes for a great day out. The day was a bit misty/smoggy so as I cropped all the photos they became a bit murky; apologies!

Brown Falcon

Brown Falcon, better not shooting into the light! 

I got a whole series of shots of this gorgeous creature because you never know how close you’ll be able to get, but this was a youngish bird so we got very close in the end, slowly step by step. So the blurry shot isn’t really excusable, but unfortunately these days I have a degree of hand shaking that is bugging me – I really need to learn to wind up my shutter speed beyond what I’ve done in the past. I have cropped this shot.

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Brown Falcon, same bird but shot into the glary sky

The conditions of the day make a huge difference as far as the photos you can achieve.

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The glare of the sky adds so much light into the camera that it can be hard to make out detail of the subject when you shoot into the light and it is backlit; this is where being able to use your settings well really comes into play…or you just accept that you are operating in impossible conditions…but what fun would that be??

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A Crested Tern on the wing

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Love Terns, they are so acrobatic in the air and a delight to photograph!

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Now THIS is a series I’m super proud of!! Just saying…a little stoush

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Now THAT’S the type of shot I want to be taking!

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Whistling Kite, not a great shot but the best I got

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Perfect! Do you know how close I had to get to this Superb Fairywren for this shot? Actually I had to wait for it to get this close to me. Time and patience pays off! About 2 metres away

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This scrappy looking guy is a male Superb Fairywren in eclipse, halfway moulting between immature and full male adult plumage in the non breeding season – this means he’s less than 5 years old

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I was sitting at lunch and all the birds took off in a big Kuffluffle behind me! It’s a tell tale sign of a bird of prey flying over; there’s a consensus amongst all the birds that this is a bad thing. 4 magpies suddenly went into attack mode and I discovered exactly where the bird of prey was! Not in focus but a nice action shot, I didn’t have much time to get off a shot

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Again, poor focus but I’m proud of this shot because I was the only one in a group of 20 that got a shot, and so I contributed a Brown Goshawk to the day’s count – I’m happy with that!!

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Spot the Little Wattlebird!

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Not perfect but a Black Kite right above my head?? Wow!

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And 2 Black Kites up there?? Perfection!

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This was my other moment of contribution – an immature Australasian Gannet, in the bay, out of the colony, away from Geelong, all on its own! I picked it out, someone else labelled it, lots of excitement all around! Love the spotty plumage – the adult is very monochrome

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Silver gulls (usually called Seagulls), Crested Terns, Chestnut Teal ducks, Little Pied Cormorant – these are all roosting in shallow water in the bay

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Little Pied Cormorants and Pied Cormorants – you can see the size difference clearly

Well, there’s some recent photos. I was overall a bit disappointed with the quality which was partly due to the weather with the glare and the smog, partly due to the settings being poorly managed and somewhat to do with this shake. Maybe I need to make a tripod part of my regular outfit for camera stability, maybe I need to go back to photography school to refresh the basics of which settings to use when, and let’s see what the doctor says about my tremor!

Enjoy!!

Goods and chattels

I’ve done this before. But since it’s a recurring theme with me, I guess it can be a recurring theme here too. It never ceases to amaze me the STUFF that goes along with medicating oneself.

The medications to start with, the prescriptions and repeats, script reminders when the repeats are running low, the safety net form to keep track off the scripts til I hopefully reach the concession limit, the receipts…well they aren’t mine but they remind me of what of mine I’ve spent…the script wallet.

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And then there’s the waste. I’m a believer in recycling and the whole reduce, reuse, recycle ethos but what do you do with this?? And this is every TWO weeks!!

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I bin or recycle, but there’s no way to reduce or reuse this lot!! Oh well, I guess that’s a bigger fight for another day.

4 years

6th March, 2018

Well I had other ideas for today’s blog, but Facebook reminded me that today 4 years ago I was recovering at home, supervised by my hubby working from home, after a VERY long afternoon/night in the emergency department having finally come to the crunch point of my nervous breakdown.

It was the first day of many days off work: 6th March 2014 to 22nd July 2015.

It felt long!

It felt like it would never to over, that life would just trickle by forever. Me at home, on my own, barely able to fill the hours of the day, just dragging along until the next…what? Hour, day, week, year?

After 18 years of full time school; 4 years of full time study plus part time work; an intern year of full time work and study; and 4 years working full time (apart from a period of 9 day fortnights during 2013 for health/stress reasons, and a brave if futile attempt to get back to work and save my job by dragging myself 2 days a week to work in the outpatient dispensary at the Alfred in the month before my contract expired late 2014) it was a shock!

I didn’t know what to do with myself physically, let alone mentally. So came a long list of attempted hobbies to try to fill up my time, more or less successfully. 4 years on, some have stuck, some haven’t, but it’s a different problem now: finding time for those hobbies! Time for bird watching, for photography, for blogging, and my re-discovered love of gardening. I’m back at work, currently 4 to 5 days a week! Who would have ever thought?! And it’s cramping my style! How’s that for ironic? For months, years in fact I’m dying to get back to work, really back to working full time or close to it, and 5 minutes later I’m missing my me time!!

It could be worse. If anyone can say that it’s me. I was worse, I’ve been worse; so I really know that it could be worse. I do. But it’s the perspective you have at the time that frames how you see things. And my perspective now is mental wellness and relatively good physical health, so the smaller things weigh more, like doing my hobbies! It’s not a bad place to be, hey? Four years on.

PSA

Here is my public service announcement (PSA).

Not to be confused with prostate-specific antigen, Pharmaceutical Society of Australia and I’m sure many other words starting with those letters positioned in that order.

Do you take any medication? Any medications?? Even one medication?

“No, only vitamins, no medications”. “Which vitamins?” “Umm…”

“Just a blood pressure tablet…oh I don’t know what it’s called, its the pink one”

“The doctor started me on an antibiotic this week, no I don’t know what it is”

Here goes, my entire public service announcement: KNOW YOUR OWN MEDICATIONS.

Every day, somewhere between 4 to 18 times depending on shift length and how busy the department is, I walk into an ED cubicle and ask a patient, do you take any medications? And I get some frustrating answers: frustrating in that the patient or their carer hasn’t taken ownership for their own or the patient’s healthcare, frustrating in that I have to put in a lot of time and effort that the patient didn’t think was worthwhile, and isn’t necessary, and I forget why else; I’m sure there was something.

 

I’m not whinging about having to do my job. The whole point of a pharmacist is to elicit the best possible medication history from or for a patient, and I have to dig a lot to get the optimal history. It’s the reason I go to work and the challenge of it creates a real sense of satisfaction once I’m certain of a patient’s medications. But I do think that patient’s have to be engaged and do their part. Obviously I cheerfully exempt unconscious patients, those who are demented/delirious, institutionalised patients and anyone else not in charge of their own medications. But the rest of you? Own your health, for your own sake if nothing else.

You don’t have to be a doctor, a healthcare professional or know anything really about medicine to excel at managing your own medications. You just have to put in  a little time and effort, and get to know the following: the medication generic name (the one in small print), or the brand name (I can work with that), and the strength of the medication. That’s it. I’m not even asking you to memorise it. In fact I don’t want you to rely on your memory. When you’re in the ED, there are so many things going on that with you that your medication name and strength are going to get prioritised right out of your memory recall centre, and be useless to both me and you! So write it down, photograph it, tattoo it on your skin if you must! Okay, the last one is a joke, people!

After that, I need to know a couple of things about each medication: how many times a day you take it, what time of day you take it, and anything else pertinent to the medication specifically. If its written down, all you have to do is hand me the list and that’s all I need; if its on your phone just hand me the phone. So if you don’t want me bugging you, and asking you questions, be organised! I will reward you.

And as an added bonus, if your medications are written out neatly and the list shows you know your doses, your medication chart will be written up quicker, more accurately and your medication chart will be safer. I think that’s worth some effort.

For instance, one patient today brought all of their own medications in a box with a handwritten list saying what time of day each was taken. I was able to record all the information I need: generic medication name, strength (from the medications themselves), and the amount she took and what time of day she took it (from the handwritten list) while the patient was sleeping. When she woke up, I just quickly ran through the list with her to confirm it was up to date, and that was that! Easy, fast, and done, just like that! Her medication chart checked for accuracy and the patient was safe to go to the ward, medication-wise.

A lot of patient’s are very good at bringing in their own medications. In fact Epworth patients are exceptional at bringing in their own medications. This is mostly because they know from their last admission or from savvy ambulance drivers that if they don’t bring their own we’ll dispense what they need, but they’ll pay the same cost as if they were getting the medication dispensed at their usual pharmacy. Most figure they’ll just use what they already have. But having all the medications together in one place at the start makes taking a medication history a lot easier and more accurate, so there’s a hot tip for you.

 

Let’s try this again: do you take any medications? Yes? So what are they? Acceptable answers include:

  1. Here is a photo on my phone of all my current medications including vitamins showing the medication name and strength of the tablet/capsule clearly
  2. Here is my medication list that I keep in my wallet/handbag/toiletry bag that I bring to hospital with the name and strength of each medication and what time of day I take them
  3. Here are all of my medications in some sort of bag
  4. Here is the name of the pharmacy where I get all/most of my medications dispensed regularly

Personally? I carry a list in a plastic slip case that I got the the National Prescribing Service (NPS): it has sections for medication name, strength, amount, time of day, diseases, allergies all neatly in a double-sided fold up sheet that fits into a plastic cover; I think you can get them from NPS online.

So even if it’s one, or two, or “just” vitamins/non-prescribed medications, take the time to record them some way, some how. This isn’t just for hospital, but of course this is from my perspective working in a hospital. But I’m sure your GP, your specialists, and maybe others will make good use of your medication recording. So get going, and do me proud! I’d love to see your efforts, so send me your best!